Practitioners, Practices and Patients: New Approaches to Medical Archaeology and Anthropology : Proceedings of a Conference Held at Magdalene College, Cambridge, November 2000

Practitioners, Practices and Patients: New Approaches to Medical Archaeology and Anthropology : Proceedings of a Conference Held at Magdalene College, Cambridge, November 2000

Medical archaeologists and anthropologists are both interested in the cultural constructions of disease, healing and medicine, but the interpretative methods used by the two groups are often quite different and interdisciplinary discussion is rare. The papers presented in this volume aim to bridge the disciplinary gap, to widen the field of interpretation, and to reconsider the cultural complexities of medical ideologies, beliefs and practices. CONTENTS: Medical anthropology, material culture, and new directions in medical archaeology (E Hsu); Diagnosing some ills: The archaeology, literature and history of Roman medicine (P A Baker); Tuberculosis: A multidisciplinary approach to past and current concepts, causes and treatment of this infectious disease (C Roberts); A preliminary account of the doctorAes grave at Stanway, Colchester, England (P Crummy); A time to live, a time to heal and a time to die: Healing and divination in later Iron Age and early Roman Britain (G Carr); A computer simulation of Mambila divination (D Zeitlyn); Beer, trees, pigs and chickens: Medical tools of the Lohorung shaman and priest (C Hardman); Healing here, there and in-between: A Tamu shamanAes experience of international landscapes (J Pettigrew and Y Tamu); The Xaghra Shaman? (S Stoddart); Tobacco and curing agency in Western Amazonian shamanism (F Barbira Freedman); Magic, healing, or death? Issues of Seidr, aebalanceAe, and morality in past and present (J Blain); Of crystal balls, political power, and changing contexts: What the clever women of Salerno inherited (C Knel); Lithic therapy in early Chinese body practices (V Lo); Kill or cure: Athenian judicial curses and the body in fear (R Anderson); Etruscan female tooth evulsion: Gold dental appliances as ornaments (M J Becker).


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